HE CALLS IT WOOD COLLAGE

May 31, 2012

While walking through the 2012 International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in NYC (May 2012), I discovered work by the artist Peter Glassford.

I went to see contemporary rugs and talk with people in the trade about how rugs are made, because people tell me my collage paintings can be interpreted as rugs. Take a look at the geometric images at my website and tell me if you agree they can be room size rugs.

WALL INSTALLATION and THE COLOR GREEN

I was amazed to see a dramatic wall installation in wood and paint and learn about works by an artist who calls himself a collage artist in wood.

Peter Glassford installation wall collage

The image above shows the installation and the artist’s mother and the scale of the wall collage.

I noticed the color from a distance, then walked closer to see the texture in the natural wood. The paint is a strong crayon green color. The artist is not afraid of color.

Peter Glassford has fine arts degrees (BFA, 1986, 1991) from the University of Texas at Austin.

Peter Glassford at the ICFF 2012

The image above shows the artist  sitting in front of a wood collage that is a folding screen painted white.

Peter Glassford says his wood collage is a fusion of his sculptural past and his business present. He makes unique furniture and he makes art.

He says he uses wood cuttings from his fine furniture factory in Mexico and creates wall installation art.

He says the repurposing closes the creative cycle and brings him back to the studio.

Sometimes he adds color.

Peter Glassford installation in progress

The work above is titled Picadillo Gems (2010). The artists is on the ladder, which shows you how large this work is. It’s installed at the Watts Law Collection, San Antonio, TX.

Peter Glassford

The above image is titled Collage Tiles

Glassford works with exotic woods – one is called parota and the other is rosa morada.

Rosa Morada comes from India, Mexico, Honduras and Asia. It is sometimes called rosewood. Parota is similar to teak wood and grows in jungles in Mexico. Read more…

A LITTLE BIT OF ART HISTORY

I spoke with the artist and mentioned the sculptor Louise Nevelson (1899 – 1988, American, born in Czarist Russia).

Because he works in wood, I thought about her work in wood. Wood was the basis for the comparison. But they work in different woods.

Louise Nevelson

Nevelson is famous for wood relief sculpture consisting of multiple boxes and compartments that include found objects from chair legs to staircase handrails, spindles, etc. Read more

The image above is Nevelson’s wall assemblage in wood, painted black.

Some of Nevelson’s works are room size. She described her sculpture as “environments.” She is considered one of the most important figures in 20th-century American sculpture.

Louise Nevelson, City Sunscape

The image above by Louise Nevelson is titled City Sunscape.

FOUND ELEMENTS vs DISCARDED ELEMENTS vs. CHOSEN ELEMENTS

Peter Glassford assumed I was comparing what he calls wall collage to Louise Nevelson’s relief sculpture. He didn’t agree with the comparison or the premise.

He said Nevelson’s sculptures included found elements that she assembled.

He said his sculptures didn’t include found elements like Nevelson’s, but were made with discarded elements – cut-offs left over from the furniture he manufactures in Mexico.

He said Nevelson typically painted her sculptures in an all-over monochromatic white or black.

He said he adds painted color (selectively) in the process as the work is installed.

Artists are so specific in the ways they describe their studio practice.

In my last post, titled Choice Collage, I wrote about the artist John Chamberlain who created metal sculpture and said he was a collage artist in metal. His retrospective exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in NYC closed May 13, 2012.

Chamberlain said he chose the pieces for his metal collages. Susan Davidson, who curated the Guggenheim Museum show, emphasized choice in Chamberlain’s work.

What is the difference between selecting and choosing and finding? I think everything is about choice.

I wonder if Louise Nevelson ever called herself a collage artist.

Next year the International Contemporary Furniture Fair will be held Saturday – Tuesday, May 18-21, 2013. Exhibition booths include contemporary furniture, seating, carpet and flooring, lighting, outdoor furniture, wall coverings, accessories, textiles and more. Read more

All image of work by Peter Glassford are from his website (Projects).

All images of work by Louise Nevelson are courtesy the Internet.

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